UC Berkeley Department of Film and Media

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Link to article 'Outstanding GSI Award - Two Film recipients!'

Outstanding GSI Award - Two Film recipients!

 Congratulations to Patrick Ellis and Chris Goetz, honorees of the 2014-15 Outstanding GSI Award!

The Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor (OGSI) Award honors over 200 UC Berkeley GSIs each year for their outstanding work in the teaching of undergraduates. These OGSI recipients are nominated from within their teaching department. The GSI Teaching & Resource Center gives the award recipients certificates of distinction and a celebratory ceremony in the spring. To find out more about this award, go to gsi.berkeley.edu

Summer 2015 Courses taught by our honorees: 

Film 25B: History of Sound Film with Patrick Ellis - required for the major!

New Media R1B: Nostalgia and the Future of New Media with Chris Goetz

 

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Link to article 'Berkeley Film Conference: Serialities 1915/2015 - Update!'

Berkeley Film Conference: Serialities 1915/2015 - Update!

Presented by the Department of Film & Media, University of California, Berkeley

FEBRUARY 26-28, 2015
Berkeley Alumni House and Nestrick Room, Dwinelle Hall

Organized by:
Alex Bush, Co-Organizer
Renée Pastel, Co-Organizer
Linda Williams

Information: http://berkeleyfilmconference.com

Tickets: Eventbrite

Facebook: Berkeley Film Conference

The 3rd International Berkeley Conference on Film and Media: Serialities 1915/2015 will build on the success of the two previous silent-film conferences held at Berkeley in 2011 and 2013. This year, the Department of Film & Media has decided to widen the scope of our biennial conference to include comparative historical inquiry.

How do we explain the emergence of film serials in silent cinema and their revival in very different forms at present? The conference will provide opportunities to reflect on the emergence of serial cultures from various angles: then and now, nationally and transnationally, across old and new media platforms. We understand seriality as any kind of repetition in difference, as when a plot continues for a much longer time than Aristotle would have permitted. Why does it flourish at particular moments? What does seriality afford? What are its causes and consequences? What are its economic foundations and stylistic forms? Are serial plots automatically also melodramas? What does serial structure do to our understanding of the totality of a work?

Keynote Speakers

Sean O'Sullivan is Associate Professor of English at Ohio State University, where he is also Director of Project Narrative and a member of the Film Studies Program. His talk is titled, "The Sonnet-Season and American Television: 1915 / 1999 / 2014."

Matthew Buckley is Associate Professor of English at Rutgers University. His talk is titled, "The Angel’s Wings: Melo-Seriality, Temporality, and the History of Form."

Mark Sandberg is Professor in the Department of Film and Media and the Department of Scandinavian at UC Berkeley. His talk is titled, "Spoiled! Trauma Time and Serial Knowledge."

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Link to article 'Call for Proposals - Third International Berkeley Conference on Film and Media'

Call for Proposals - Third International Berkeley Conference on Film and Media

On February 26-28, the Department of Film & Media at the University of California Berkeley will host the Third International Berkeley Conference on Film and Media: Serialities 1915/2015.

Building on the success of the two previous silent-film conferences held at Berkeley in 2011 and 2013, the Department of Film & Media has decided to widen the scope of our biennial conference to include comparative historical inquiry.

The conference will reflect on the emergence of serial cultures from various angles: then and now, nationally and transnationally, across old and new media platforms. Why does seriality flourish at particular moments? What are its causes and consequences, economic foundations and stylistic forms? What does it afford? The dates, 1915 and 2015, are not meant as strict boundaries, but simply to signal two important “moments” when multiple forms of seriality have seemed to mark an era--one before film lengths were standardized, the other after television serials have challenged that very standard. We welcome papers that compare these eras or that explore serial production and consumption in its broadest sense in any applicable time period. Types of seriality could be non-narrative, as in the case of panoramas and serial motion studies, or narrative as in the case of the industrialization of literature in the roman-feuilletons, the adaptation of these feuilletons into film serials of the teens and twenties, radio serials, television serials, and new streaming platforms, videogames and online media. We encourage participation from a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, music, architecture, literature, art history, theater, dance and performance studies, as well as perspectives that are international and comparative.

Proposals should include a title, an abstract of no more than 300 words, a short 100 word bio and any A/V needs submitted no later than October 31, 2014. Notification will follow within a month. Send to theconference@berkeley.edu.

 

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